Should I build a big CNC router?

I know I would like to build a Computer Numeric Control  (CNC) router big enough to drop a sheet of ply in, but is it a good idea? It will take up a lot of my workshop space, and chew up a lot of time and money. It’ll allow me to makes some awesome large objects. Anyone want a kayak? It would be big enough to make small boat ribs etc. Storage boxes, and display panels, doll houses and 1/2 of the things in ikea. All doable. But am I going to do them? A lot of the CNC routers on the internet seem to get used to make more CNC routers. Thats fine by me, although a boat sounds more fun.

I’ve read about people who have purchased shopbot routers with the belief that they’ll form some kind of business around them, and some have successfully done so. It seems a bold choice to me, but as James Graham said.

He either fears his fate too much,
Or his deserts are small,
That dares not put it to the touch
To gain or lose it all.

Maybe now is the time to build a big CNC router.

PS. I’ve found a few places around that I can get stuff cut at. I’m going to test the waters out by doing a few projects on someone else’s CNC router first.

The Mini Mill is live

I picked up a 7×7 mill from Zen toolworks a while ago. I did the basic assembly and powered it up with an old 24v power supply. It moved, but locked up on the far X axis, and the far Y axis, and stalled with any high speed movement. At that point it all got boxed up for a house move, and stayed that way for a year. I’ve recently dragged it back out and thrown some more time at getting it setup.

I lined up the bottom frame using a machinist square. It was close enough that I could just shim out one corner with a piece of paper. The stepper motors  pull more power the faster they run. The old 2.5 amp 24V psu wasn’t providing  enough power as the acceleration kicked in. I’ve swapped it out for new 14.6 amp 24v psu. I still found some issues with the alignment of the anti-backlash nut on the Y axis. The problem with this is that you can’t easily access the anti-backlash nut. After a good look around the machine, and I decided to remove the 16 screws securing the back plate from the gantry. I could then access the mounting screws for the anti-backlash nut by loosening the  mounting screws and moving it to the far side of the Y axis. I could then tighten the mounting screws with the anti-backlash nut in the correct alignment.

Also, I got a video cam for my birthday, so here’s a time lapse of the job progress.

Northern Makers meet up

Northern makers had a meet up in Westgarth on Saturday night. It was a bit late notice, but we still had five people there. There was a Mendel Max being assembled, some arduino controlled led strips, analogue synth boards being soldered, and I was trying to work the kinks out of my mini CNC mill.

They are a nice bunch of people, and it was very good to see what other people where working on. They’re proposing to book it in as a regular thing, one Saturday a month. I suspect it’ll be a regular outing for me.